‘Sleazy tabloid accusations . . .’

. . . have a predictable way of proving true:

When a person’s image is a commodity — as was the case with John Edwards, the millionaire of humble origins whose family life supposedly kept him grounded — the ideas of privacy and good taste become part of the marketing effort. The tabloids, rude and prying, are able to break through such images to the truth behind them in ways the conventional media cannot. . . .
“False, absolute nonsense,” an Edwards spokesperson told the Enquirer at the beginning of the Edwards-affair affair in October 2007, while the candidate was still working the heartland on his way to a second-place finish, ahead of Hillary Clinton, in the Iowa caucuses. Against that blanket denial, the paper cited “a source close to the woman” and “one bombshell e-mail message” to support what it called a “shocking allegation — if proven true.”

As previously noted, newspapers were generally more successful when they were more tabloid-ish, and before they gave op-ed space to dishonest twits like Frank Rich.

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