Archive for ‘Eric Holder’

February 21, 2009

Perpetual victimhood, permanent grievance

Observing Black History Month with my latest column at Pajamas Media:

With so many problems afflicting America today, especially with the economy in crisis, what purpose was served by [Attorney General Eric] Holder’s remarks? Trillions of dollars in asset value were wiped out by the collapse of the housing “bubble” and the ripple effects of that collapse have shaken financial institutions worldwide to their very foundations. It hardly seems a convenient moment for an angry racial harangue from the nation’s chief law enforcement official.
Particularly odd was that Holder chose to deliver his lecture in the middle of Black History Month, when America’s school children are annually immersed in the subject of race. Originally conceived by pioneering scholar Carter G. Woodson as a means of inspiring black youth by celebrating the accomplishments of overlooked achievers, in recent decades Black History Month has been hijacked by those who view the story of African-Americans not as one of hard-earned progress, but of perpetual victimhood and permanent grievance.
Most Americans over age 30 have little idea how the teaching of history has been perverted by the damaging attitudes Shelby Steele examined in his 2007 bestseller, White Guilt. And because history has been hijacked by grievance mongers and guilt-trippers, most Americans under age 30 have absolutely no idea of what a triumphant tale our nation has to tell . . .

You should read the whole thing. And here’s a half-hour documentary video (a rough-cut of a new production by Nina May scheduled for release next month) that defies Holder’s “nation of cowards” slur:

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February 19, 2009

Eric Holder: Quota king

Quin Hillyer calls our attention to an article by Heather Mac Donald pointing out how Eric Holder imposed stringent racial policies on L.A. police in 2000:

Bill Lann Lee, head of the Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division, insisted that the LAPD be put under a federal monitor who would dictate nearly every aspect of policing practice and policy for a minimum of five years. Lee presented the city with a massive consent decree that would bind the LAPD to the DOJ’s supervision — and if the city refused to sign, DOJ would take Los Angeles to court. Included in the proposed decree’s 180 provisions were mandates to record the race of every suspect whom officers stopped, though the Rampart scandal had had nothing to do with so-called “racial profiling.”
In their September 2000 call to Deputy Attorney General Holder, Mayor Riordan and Chief Parks stressed that the city was already doing everything possible to prevent a reoccurrence of the abuses and that a federal monitor would only impede the department’s ability to operate and pursue existing reforms. Holder was unmoved. DOJ would either see Los Angeles in court or impose a consent decree on it, he wrote back. The federal juggernaut was unstoppable. In 2001, the LAPD signed the decree, starting a process of debilitating resource-drain and wholly useless bureaucratic paper-pushing. Holder had played a significant role in “negotiating” the decree, according to the Los Angeles Times.
Complying with the federal straitjacket cost the always cash-starved LAPD $40 million in its first year and $50 million each year thereafter, according to city estimates.

In other words, rather than having police do their jobs — busting criminals — Holder insisted they spent untold thousands of man-hours filling out federal compliance paperwork to prove that L.A. cops weren’t “profiling,” even though the pretext for this intervention had nothing to do with “profiling.” 

The nation’s chief law-enforcement office hates cops — and he’s too much of a coward to admit it.
February 18, 2009

Why we can’t talk about race

“[T]he need to confront our racial past and to understand our racial present, and to understand the history of African people in this country — that all endures. . . . Though race-related issues continue to occupy a significant portion of our political discussion, and though there remain many unresolved racial issues in this nation, we, average Americans, simply do not talk enough with each other about things racial.”
Eric Holder

Let’s start with the fact that some “talk . . . about things racial” is privileged and celebrated, whereas other “talk . . . about things racial” is streng verboten. Also, let’s talk about the fact that liberals are absolutely humorless and vindictive douchebags. Or better yet, let’s don’t talk about it at all, because I’m tired of talking about it, and would never introduce the topic except that it seems to be just about the only thing that liberals want to talk about while they hand each other million-dollar “genius” grants and congratulate themselves on how morally superior they are.

Bite me, Eric Holder, you corrupt thug.

Michelle Malkin has more.

UPDATE: “. . . aside from the occasional insinuation that McCain’s a bigot . . .” No, not me — this time.

UPDATE II: Lorie Byrd has an interesting reaction. She also has an interesting photo of Beyonce. NTTATWWT. (Wait a minute — is that Beyonce or Mariah? Eh, who cares? You’ve seen one diva, you’ve seen ’em all.)

UPDATE III: Linked by Kathy Shaidle, who informs me that her “tolerant” enemies consider her very existence a human-rights violation.

UPDATE IV: Eric Holder slanders America

UPDATE V: More courageous conversation!

January 10, 2009

Smoothville Express

When Bill Richardson pulled out, MK Ham quipped, “The Obama transition train just keeps on chugging down the tracks to Smoothville, huh?” And the Smoothville Express just keeps on a-chugging:

Eric H. Holder Jr. is facing increasing resistance to his bid to become the next attorney general, emerging from President-elect Barack Obama’s Cabinet nominees as the prime target of Senate Republicans, both because of troubling episodes during his service in the Clinton administration and because of the sensitivity of the post overseeing the Justice Department. . . .
Specter previewed the main line of attack in a floor speech this week, asserting that, in Holder’s years as President Bill Clinton’s deputy attorney general, he at times “appeared to be serving the interest of his superiors” rather than heeding recommendations from career Justice Department lawyers. The argument echoed criticism that former attorney general Alberto R. Gonzales, who resigned in 2007, had acted to please his friend President Bush rather than to uphold the principles of justice.

(H/T: Hot Air.) I don’t know who’s calling the plays in the Senate GOP huddle, but having Specter take the ball on this one is very smart. Specter can’t be credibly accused of being a right-wing ideologue or a partisan hit man. Now, if the Republicans on the Foreign Relations Committee can find somebody willing to be point-man on Hillary’s nomination as Secretary of State, we might be in for a few weeks of real fun.

Chug, chug, chug . . .